Spears

“But our tools, captain. How can we do anything without our tools?” The ensign seemed a bit out of breath, just from exasperation.

“Not exactly, ensign. The one thing I’ve learned about warfare, hide a knife where they won’t look!” The captain then proceeded to reach his hand into his pants and produce a small pocket knife. He had the biggest grin on his face whenever he pulled one over on his enemy. This was a face I’d seen multiple times. I just sat back waiting for the show.

These kids were green behind the ears, still. They were new recruits from back at the base, and this was the new program to keep the army brats out of trouble.

“We are surrounded by tools, we just now have to make them!” And he proceeded to hack at the bamboo that was growing rampant outside our human cage. I was silent as he eyed me for back-up. I figured he’d put himself in this mess, he should get himself out of it.

“A little help here, mate?” He looked in my direction.

“Hey, man, YOU started this!” I said, walking towards the front of the crowd, feeling my own pocket knife in my pants.

 

 

https://www.etsy.com/listing/452007992/spears?ref=shop_home_active_50

Advertisements

Not Blackberries

black·ber·ry

ˈblakˌberē

noun
noun: blackberry; plural noun: blackberries

1. an edible soft fruit, consisting of a cluster of soft purple-black drupelets.

2. the prickly climbing shrub of the rose family that bears this fruit and that grows extensively in the wild.

verb

verb: blackberry;
3rd person present: blackberries;
past tense: blackberried;
past participle: blackberried;
gerund or present participle: blackberrying

1. gather blackberries in the wild.

Black·Ber·ry
ˈblakˌberē/

noun
noun: BlackBerry; plural noun: BlackBerries

1. trademark
a handheld mobile device that provides Internet access along with e-mail, telephone, and text messaging services.

verb

verb: BlackBerry;
3rd person present: BlackBerries;
gerund or present participle: BlackBerrying;
past tense: BlackBerried;
past participle: BlackBerried

1. communicate with (someone) using a BlackBerry device.
“I was BlackBerrying them while the speech was going on”

Up & Down

“But our tools, captain. How can we do anything without our tools?” The ensign seemed a bit out of breath, just from exasperation.

“Not exactly, ensign. The one thing I’ve learned about warfare, hide a knife where they won’t look!” The captain then proceeded to reach his hand into his pants and produce a small pocket knife. He had the biggest grin on his face whenever he pulled one over on his enemy. This was a face I’d seen multiple times. I just sat back waiting for the show.

These kids were green behind the ears, still. They were new recruits from back at the base, and this was the new program to keep the army brats out of trouble.

“We are surrounded by tools, we just now have to make them!” And he proceeded to hack at the bamboo that was growing rampant outside our human cage. I was silent as he eyed me for back-up. I figured he’d put himself in this mess, he should get himself out of it.

“A little help here, mate?” He looked in my direction.

“Hey, man, YOU started this!” I said, walking towards the front of the crowd, feeling my own pocket knife in my pants.

Little Lion Man

“Guardian lions are referred to in various ways depending on language and context. In Chinese they are traditionally called simply shi (獅, Pinyin: shī) meaning lion — the word shi itself is thought to be derived from the Persian word šer.[2] Lions were first presented to the Han court by emissaries from Central Asia and Persia, and by the sixth century AD they were already popularly depicted as guardian figures.[3] Today the guardian lions are more usually specified by reference to the medium or material, for example:

Stone lion (石獅, Pinyin: Shíshī): for a stone sculpture; or
Bronze lion (銅獅, Pinyin: Tóngshī): for a bronze sculpture
and less commonly:

Auspicious lion (瑞獅, Pinyin: Ruìshī): referring to the Tibetan Snow Lion or good fortune
Fortuitous lion (福獅, Pinyin: fúshī)[citation needed]: referring to good fortune
Buddha’s or Buddhist lion (佛獅, Pinyin: fóshī)[citation needed]: referring in a religious context to the lion as protector of Buddha.”

*Taken from Wikipedia.

 

https://www.etsy.com/listing/465184637/little-lion-man?ref=shop_home_active_8